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OPEN STUDIOS: Artist Checklist

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  This document provides a complete Artist Checklist for artists that are planning to host an Open Studio.

PDF Download PDF for Open Studio: Artist Checklist

An Open Studio event brings the artist and the public together. It is an opportunity to expose a broad portion of the community to what it is we do and make. We can educate them on how and why we build what we do. We can answer technical questions and address issues of price and materials. We can even dispel a few myths and misconceptions. And, of course, we can open the door to new markets.

The Open studio is also an invaluable opportunity for us to see, first hand, how our work is received. In the case of wearable work we can observe how objects fit or hang or how clasps and closures function. We observe first hand who responds to a particular series or media and why. We can ask specific questions and gather immediate and, perhaps, honest information about our work that can be very difficult to glean without directly engaging the public.

Participating in an Open Studio event is not for everybody. While it can be beneficial in many ways and offer important insights into the conception, design, manufacturing and marketing of our work, there are many issues to be contemplated. If you have local, or even national, gallery representation there may be concerns regarding exclusivity and commissions. Allowing people to spend time in your workspace can be both an energizing and unnerving experience; simply dealing with the general public can be eye opening.

This Open Studio: Artist Checklist document will help you decide if taking part in such an event would be personally advantageous and then to help guide you through the process. These guidelines should be considered and tailored to the specific needs and situations of each individual artist or craftsman.
 

TABLE of CONTENTS
     Introduction
II     Some Reasons to Participate in an Open Studio Event
III    Some Reasons that You May Not Want to Participate in Open Studios
IV    Concerns and Considerations
V     Planning for an Open Studios Event
VI    Prepare Your Space for the Open Studio Event
VII   Music
VIII  Refreshments
IX    Insurance
X     Presentation of Your Work
XI    Artist Behavior
XII   Retail Sales
XIII  Follow-Up After Open Studios is Over
   
 

Below is an excerpt from the Open Studios: Artist Checklist.

 


      II
Some Reasons to Participate in an Open Studio Event

            A Generation of revenue
            B Exposure to a new audience
            C Keep-established clients abreast of current work
            D Educate a broad audience about your media, showing techniques to interested people
            E  Break down barriers by allowing the artist and the public direct and immediate interaction
            and communication
            F As an information gathering tool
            G Networking: Connecting with other artists and professionals, in and outside of your medium
            H Introduce your work to possible collectors, galleries or curators


      III Some Reasons that You May Not Want to Participate in Open Studios

            A If you have local gallery representation that may see such participation as competition
            B Artists who are uncomfortable in public situations may find such an event unappealing.
            Giving the public access to an artist’s workspace can, for some, be an unsettling experience.
            C Some studios may be dangerous or unhealthy places for the public.
            D Artist or maker has no need to expand clientele or investigate new demographics.

   
 

For more information PDF download the PDF for Open Studio: Artist Checklist to learn more about hosting your own Open Studio.

There is a second document PDF Open Studios: A Guide for Organizations Sponsoring an Open Studio Event written to help organizations sponsor an open studio event either city wide, throughout a county or in your local area.

Creative Commons License
Harriete Estel Berman by Professional Guidelines for the Arts and Craft Community is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://www.harriete-estel-berman.info/profguidelines/profguide.html.
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